Flight Skills

  1. Light wind freedom on a paraglider (or hang glider)

    Light wind freedom on a paraglider (or hang glider)

    Flybubble's Carlo Borsattino offers some tips for flying well on a paraglider (or hang glider) on light wind days.

  2. Is Everybody OK? (by Steve Empringham)

    Is Everybody OK? (by Steve Empringham)

    Is it just me, or do some aspects of paragliding strike you as, well, just a bit abnormal?

  3. XC Secrets: How To Fly XC (On A Paraglider)

    XC Secrets: How To Fly XC (On A Paraglider)

    Being able to land softly, every time, is a great skill to have. It’s essential for cross country flying, when you don’t know what you’re going to be landing on. I’ve landed on everything from rocky mountain-sides and vineyards to carparks and golf courses. The setup remains the same regardless of the obstacles you encounter: it’s essential that you land pointed into wind, with enough speed to get a swoop out of your flare.

  4. X-Pyr 2016 Flybubble Team report

    X-Pyr 2016 Flybubble Team report

    X-Pyr is a race along the length of the Pyrenees mountains, which divide Spain and France. It alternates with the Red Bull X-Alps race for the title of toughest paragliding event of the year. Contestants must carry their paraglider (or fly with it). The course is 480 km, the race starts at 05:30 and ends at 22:30 every day, and lasts about a week. Flybubble team pilot Greg competed in the 2016 edition.

  5. Bornes To Fly 2016 tactical review

    Bornes To Fly 2016 tactical review

    A tactical review from the midfield by Greg Hamerton: I don't like jogging. My normal day involves 10 hours or so of sitting at a PC, interrupted by exciting moments of coffee and chocolate. Occasionally, if the weather's good, I'll go flying instead. So to even consider something like the Bornes To Fly, I knew I needed some body-conditioning. Then there was the unavoidable fact that my name appears on the XPYR entry list for July, along with Maurer, Durogati and Coconea.

  6. Safety: Managing the Mayhem

    Safety: Managing the Mayhem

    Team pilot Ruth Churchill Dower recounts a high altitude incident in the Himalaya. A sudden updraught led to a stall and cascade. Despite having two reserve parachutes, Ruth lost 1000ft trying to fix the wing and landed in a tailslide on a precipitous ridgetop perch, luckily mostly unscathed. It makes a cracking story, and there's a good deal to learn about managing mayhem and your personal reserve deployment throwing height.

  7. UK Paragliding XC Season 2015: Summer & Autumn

    UK Paragliding XC Season 2015: Summer & Autumn

    Being able to land softly, every time, is a great skill to have. It’s essential for cross country flying, when you don’t know what you’re going to be landing on. I’ve landed on everything from rocky mountain-sides and vineyards to carparks and golf courses. The setup remains the same regardless of the obstacles you encounter: it’s essential that you land pointed into wind, with enough speed to get a swoop out of your flare.

  8. UK Paragliding XC Season 2015 Summary

    UK Paragliding XC Season 2015 Summary

    Flying cross country (XC) on a paraglider in the UK offers many challenges and unique experiences. In this article Flybubble's MD and Chief Flying Instructor, Carlo Borsattino summarises the action from the most successful UK paragliding XC season in history... so grab a cuppa and enjoy the lengthy report at your leisure! There's lots to learn from reviewing the days that worked well, and what pilots chose to do.

    The Pilots' Tales section offers a unique perspective from some of the leading pilots in the UK. To make it easier to read we refer to the 2015 UK Paragliding XC League as 'the League' and have rounded all distances to the nearest kilometre.

  9. UK Paragliding XC Season 2015: Spring

    UK Paragliding XC Season 2015: Spring

    Paragliding cross country season report for Spring 2015 in the United Kingdom.

  10. UK Paragliding XC Season 2015: Winners

    UK Paragliding XC Season 2015: Winners

    Being able to land softly, every time, is a great skill to have. It’s essential for cross country flying, when you don’t know what you’re going to be landing on. I’ve landed on everything from rocky mountain-sides and vineyards to carparks and golf courses. The setup remains the same regardless of the obstacles you encounter: it’s essential that you land pointed into wind, with enough speed to get a swoop out of your flare.

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